National Recognition For Our First UK Aid Direct Project

National Recognition For Our First UK Aid Direct Project

We have been delighted to be featured by several prominent newspapers in recognition of our first Small Charities Challenge Fund project funded by the UK’s Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office through UK Aid Direct.

This project, alongside some of our other work and the history of The Turing Trust, has been featured by several local media outlets including the Daily Record, The Scotsman, MK Citizen, and the Herald. This positive coverage has been a great boon to us and our work as we have seen a significant increase in the number of donations since it was published.

The UK Government’s Small Charities Challenge Fund helps smaller organisations deliver vital humanitarian and development work to the world’s most vulnerable people.

At The Turing Trust we are building on the legacy of Alan Turing, by enabling schools in Malawi to be part of the digital revolution – giving children computing skills that are crucial for creating jobs and prosperity in the 21st century. This project, funded with UK aid from the British people, will enable us to provide IT equipment, training and support to 6,500 schoolgirls in Malawi, helping transform their education. You can find out more about our Small Charities Fund project in this video:

Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said:

It is wonderful to see The Turing Trust build on the outstanding legacy of Alan Turing, by enabling schools in Malawi to be part of the digital ­revolution – giving children computing skills that are crucial for creating jobs and prosperity in the 21st century.

Dominic Raab, Foreign Secretary, 2020

James Turing, Alan Turing’s great-nephew, who has been featured in the coverage, has shown his deep gratitude and pride in being able to carry on with Alan Turing’s legacy.

My great uncle Alan is often known as the father of modern computer science, and we are proud to be continuing his legacy by helping some of the world’s poorest communities get access to computer technology.

James Turing, 2020

Malawi ranked 142 out of 162 countries in the United Nations Gender Inequality Index in 2019. This is something that our Small Charities Challenge project seeks to address. Many girls in rural schools in Malawi will have access to computers in the classroom for the first time. We will also set up girls only ICT clubs, provide teacher training and showcase women already working in the field of ICT (including our project administrator Doreen Luhanga). We aim to inspire girls to be confident in their own ICT skills and to go onto study ICT at university and become the ICT professionals and teachers of tomorrow.

I want to be more familiar with computers and have a chance of developing the computer industry in Malawi.

Monalisa Matengo, Form 4 student

The press coverage gives a lot more detail on the history of The Turing Trust and its link with Alan Turing and on our project to provide digital skills to 6,500 Malawian girls, marginalised by gender, disability and geography, preparing them for life, study and work in the 21st Century. If you would like more information, please click on the relevant logo to access the full article.

The Herald logo
MK Citizen logo and link
Daily Record logo
The Scotsman logo and link